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Versatile Antiguan DJ plans to rock the city, post covid.

While it is true that the impact of the global pandemic can be felt in the corporate society, the entertainment industry worldwide has suffered a severe blow. At one point, nightlife came to a complete stand still and there was neither a party nor event to attend. No gatherings. No socializing. On the island of Antigua, scores of patrons who had grown accustomed to feting and revelry were left disappointed as this years’ carnival celebrations were cancelled. Pre- covid, both expats and tourists alike visited the island religiously to celebrate its emancipation from slavery. Before the actual week of festivities, multiple fetes and parties are usually held during the season. This is the time when most of the island’s DJ’s and entertainers make their living. One such entertainer, Omari Anthony, aka “Versatile Virus” calls the island his home, and he’s eager to rock the city with his talents once again.

Why Virus?

This was the first question that came to mind. Omari attended the St. Joseph’s Academy during his teen years. This all-boys, privately owned Catholic Diocesan school was founded on the island by The Christian Brothers in 1958, and has produced a few prominent officials on the island like businessman and parliamentarian Max Fernandez and Attorney and former Senator, Lenworth Johnson to name a few. During Omari’s tenure at the school, he excelled in the subject area of Information Technology. It was generally accepted that they all have monikers so with his classmate’s assistance, the moniker ‘virus’ stuck with him into his professional career. He also discovered his love for music while attending the school. He hosted a number of parties and school events with his friends and this further solidified his love for the craft. He officially began Deejaying in 2007 and since then he has been a part of several major events, many of which he was called back to do an encore performance. He highlighted working with Myst carnival, Project Sync and Wardadli Soulja’s as some of his most profound accomplishments.

His love for the artform supersedes all, but this DJ is not all about music. He is also a true sports fan. He once performed as a wicket keeper and prolific batsman for Antigua’s under 13/15/19 cricket team. Within his own community, he played for the Liberta sports club. Outside of the local sporting arena, he avidly follows the NFL and the NBA.

True Love

A love for music will always expose the creativity in someone who is truly passionate about the craft, and Omari has done just that. He loves to incorporate hidden messages which he coins ‘easter eggs’ in his productions. What exactly does this mean? I guess we will just have to find out! As much as he enjoys the art of deejaying, Omari aspires to find ways to integrate his deejaying, vocal talents and production abilities to develop a fully functional career all rolled into one. While we’re on the topic of Love, Omari credits much of the strength needed to endure the rolling tides of the entertainment industry to his loving fiancée and his management team, as well as his avid fans. They love what he does and keep him inspired with constant positivity. You can find this versatile DJ on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. He has also been featured on local radio airwaves and this, coupled with his live performances have aided tremendously in growing his visibility and engagement as an artist. He is confident that the marketing of his skill set would not have been possible without the tremendous support and engagement of Myst carnival, project sync, Sarah McMillan, together dubbed “Team contagious.” 

Overcome!

This rising star has encountered his fair share of obstacles in both his personal circles and the industry itself. He cited Nepotism as one of the predominant ills in our society that affects him personally. The effects of the covid 19 pandemic have been the most recent struggle that threatens to dim his shine, but this young entertainer will not be discouraged. He has plans that once carried out with precision, we are confident that this DJ will rock the entertainment scene post covid like never before! He took the time to offer his colleagues some serious advice about the industry:

“Even if it seems controversial, take the opportunity for yourself and don’t think that anybody else deserves more that you do, because I made the mistake in thinking that certain persons were more deserving of the opportunities that I had and it resulted in me not performing at a level that I knew I could have done even better”.

What’s Up Next?

Team Contagious and Young Luiy entertainment are the parent bodies under which Versatile Virus performs.  Together, they’ve got a few treats in store for the entertainment world, as they’ve been working on a few live streamed events to bring the ‘noise’ back to the city.  If you like to party and you need some relief from all the happenings around us, we have one suggestion. Don’t take  your eyes off this DJ!

Follow him Now on  SoundCloud and Audiomack for his daily mixes.

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She Was Told her Business couldn’t work on an Island; Now, her Organic Line Comprises 4 Brands!

BY TARYN ST.LOUIS, SEPTEMBER 18th, 2020

Many Caribbean customs were birthed from the teachings and inspiration of our African Ancestors. Anastasha Elliott, affectionately known as Ana, grew up observing her elders use the most eccentric Afro-Caribbean concoctions to cure everything from the common cold to the most troubling skin conditions. Her native island of St. Kitts is a part of the federation of St. Kitts and Nevis, and is well known as the Sugar City of The Caribbean. The island earned its moniker because of its sugar cane plantations which were stationed throughout the island in the early 16th century. The island was formed by now dormant volcanoes, and is also known for its green monkeys and carnival festivities.

Ana enjoys being an island girl and often finds herself hiking through its tropical terrain and sailing the surrounding tranquil waters. She is also an avid reader, and this has been a significant aid in the research she constantly carries out in order to produce the most quality products in her organic hair, skin and nutrition line, Sugar Town Organics.

At the tender age of 12, this now 38 year old inspiring entrepreneur received some life changing news about her mother. She was diagnosed with cervical cancer, and as hard as this news was on the entire family, they all strengthened their resolve to provide healing through the very same natural remedies they had been using within the family for years. Sugar Town Organics was birthed once Ana realized the power that food had on regeneration, healing and empowerment. Call it an obsession if you may, but once you see real results such as those obtained when her mother was healed, you instantly want to help others see the truth behind the power of medicine, natures way.

The family – run business now comprises multiple brands, with products for baby and the entire family:

  • Yaphene : The core/starter line which comprises hair and body care products
  • Baba by Yaphene : A Baby Care Line
  • Marapa Luxury by Yaphene: A Skin Care Line
  • Flauriel Foods : The beverage, sauces, treats and vegan wine line of products.

Everything is made on the premise of food, chosen for their properties and what they offer the human body to enhance mealtime and to make daily living healthier for the family.

I personally visited their online store at Sugar town Organics, and from the colorful packaging to the beautiful logos, I could tell that this brand is inherently Caribbean! I was especially impressed with the selection of skin care items including soaps that were displayed in a variety of ‘flavors’, to include frangipani/plumeria and silk cashmere. As I wandered through the pages, I noticed a few wines that caught my attention. My eyes landed on Breadfruit Wine! How innovative is that? Needless to say, I am intrigued and will be ordering soon!

Sugar Town organics operates within Caribbean borders but Ana is now in the process of extending her market reach internationally. Selected products from the line will be heading to the USA for retail in October, so for those of you who live stateside, look out for this product line in a store near you! The website will also be opened to receive U.S orders with shipping happening through Miami. The logistics are still a work in progress, but with the present pace of this dynamic innovator, it is evident that Sugar Town organics is set to become a worldwide brand.

Ana has experienced her fair share of obstacles as a black business owner, from financial difficulty to persons undermining her concepts, and even personal issues that threatened to derail her and question her own ability. Ana recalls a meeting at a national bank where her hopes were dashed and she was told by a banking official that her business could not work on an island. She could have conceded to fear and heeded this ill-advice, however she persisted. She credits her strong family support system for her tenacity. They have supported her in any way the could from assisting her in marketing campaigns to driving her to far-away pop up shops. She is grateful for an amazing network of women who saw her vision and helped to multiply her dream.

“No matter what, I have always found a way around, over or through it. I must give thanks for this tenacity I inherited from my mother. Growing up, I saw her work hard and struggle but she held her head high and faced her obstacles with grace, grit and purpose.”

Anastasha Elliott

She shared some invaluable advice for other business owners like herself. She believes that there are many instances where we begin our entrepreneurial journeys at a disadvantage, however, if we are willing to do some honest and unbiased introspection, we will be better able to spot our shortcomings and improve. She also advised that it may be difficult to find assistance, but never give up! Help is out there if we just search for it. Finally, don’t be afraid to start small. “Take it step by step, we have a saying where I am from, ‘likkle likkle mek plenty ..”

I have just outlined some major positives about this black owned business, but wait! There’s more! Sugar Town Organics gives back! Once a year, Ana works with new startups by either mentoring or coaching. Her last mentee was Argrow’s House of Healing and Hope for Survivors of Domestic Abuse, run by Dr. Kit Ford Davenport of Iowa. Ana is quite proud of what she has accomplished over the last year in aiding female survivors of domestic violence to earn a living, become empowered, and learn marketable skills that enable them to chart the way forward for themselves and their families.  Giving back to your community while building your own brand may seem a daunting task, but it is with this ethos that we open our enterprise to universal blessings. With all she does, Ana still finds the time to educate her customers about the herbs around them and how they can be used. “It is a knowledge we seem to have lost in many ways and as an integral part of our culture as people of color it is important for us to rekindle this knowledge in each other.” 

Ana’s Mission as CEO of Sugar Town Organics is to engender a love of our blackness in our people by crafting products that bring out the beauty of who they are, encouraging them to relearn love of self and all it entails from our kinky coily hair, to our beautiful melanin skin. She does this one product at a time, one customer at a time. With her business acumen, tenacity and support system, I am encouraged to believe that going forward her black owned business will not only survive, but thrive!

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Young Jamaican/Antiguan Artist exposes quality Hip Hop from the Islands

BY TARYN ST.LOUIS, SEPTEMBER 8th, 2020

He’s only 23 but has already had the pleasure of participating in a few musical events in his present twin -island home of Antigua & Barbuda, including the ever- popular Antigua Sailing week and “Wadadli Kingz, Just Got Started.” Christopher Howell grew up in the reggae-centric Caribbean island of Jamaica, where he earned the moniker ‘Young Luiy’ because of a small Louis Vuitton bag which he donned in primary school. The name stuck and he has grown to infuse his unique and authentic tastes into his music.

Chris got his introduction to the world of Hip Hop in his hometown of Jamaica, when his childhood friend, a hip hop artist himself, introduced him to the recording studio. He immediately felt at home. When placed in front of the mic, he imagined himself among the hip hop greats that he admired such as Lil Wayne and J Cole.

Young Luiy is confident that his love for music was fortified by the rich musical culture of Jamaica where he grew up. Jamaica has spawned a plethora of internationally renowned artists like Beenie Man, Chronix, Sean Paul and Koffee, to name a few. Reggae is the most widely known genre of music in Jamaica and it was popularized by the legendary Bob Marley and the Wailers in the 1960s. Soon, the selection of genres expanded to include dancehall and dub.


With the introduction of sound systems, American music found its way into the households of the islanders. According to worldmusic.net, sound systems were an extremely significant development in Jamaican music, and helped to develop the Jamaican record industry. When radios finally became affordable to the majority of Jamaicans, there was a boom in the popularity of American R&B, but it did not stop there.

Did you know that Hip Hop has inherent ties with Jamaica and Reggae? Reggae was the most influential figure in the development of Hip Hop. Although Hip Hop wasn’t exactly discovered in Jamaica, The dubbing and toasting techniques used in reggae directly influenced America’s techniques of emceeing and scratching.

Reggae!

Rrrroots, rap, reggae!

And we don’t stop

It’s like that y’all, and then we’re ready to play

It’s no jive, it’s live, and it’s reggae.

These famous lines are in Run DMC’s “Roots, Rap, Reggae” and reflect the influence of Jamaica within hip-hop. Read more on how Jamaica’s place in Hip Hop was recognized.


Many use my outer exterior as a means to figure out who I am, but in retrospect if I wasn’t an aspiring musician, I could have been your favorite chef, your favorite technology teacher or even your most courageous journalist.” However, I love what I do. I am an artist.

Young Luiy

Grateful for his multi-cultural background, Young Luiy credits this quality for his ability to speak to and entertain both his American and Caribbean Audiences. His musical style is upbeat, raw and explicit in some cases. His tracks can all be found on his YouTube Channel, IamYoungLuiy. There’s no doubt that this artist is has an incredible ability to incorporate his native ‘twang’ into his Hip Hop verses. One of his latest singles, Bragginz/Benz, highlights this artist’s versatility. Listen Below, and be sure to subscribe!

His advice to upcoming artists

Stay being you and true to whom you are, never let your worth be defined by the stereotypes of the world or what you see on social media. Being black and authentic is a great privilege which will bring forth great scrutiny and hate, but never let that hinder you from accomplishing the big dreams you are aiming for”. 

Throughout history, black culture has been known to influence all genres of music. Having had such an influence on the very musical cultures of our oppressors, only to be targeted by those influenced, should only give you even more courage to stand with your own and cement your very will to exceed all expectations within the music industry. Young Luiy has taken this thought to heart as he sets his sights on future projects.

What’s Next for this island artist?

Growth. His hopes are to continue expanding his platform both regionally and internationally. He is also the father to a 2 year old son; his heir and driving force, Aahron Howell. Chris is on a mission to bring the international spotlight to Hip Hop and R&B music in the Caribbean. He is confident that one day, the world will acknowledge the hard work and dedication of talented artists in this corner of the world.

“We are so much more than just Dancehall, Reggae, and Soca. There is so much more here than beautiful vacation spots. It’s time the world knew that we have so much more to offer.”

Find Young Luiy on Instagram and Facebook

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Why Caribbean Parents don’t say “I Love you.”

BY TARYN ST.LOUIS, JUNE 10, 2020

If you grew up in a Caribbean household, you probably can identify with this topic of interest. I grew up on a tiny Caribbean Island called Antigua, and my father was a huge disciplinarian. Being a police sergeant in the Royal Police Force of Antigua and Barbuda, meant that he was exposed to the realities of many social ills on a daily basis. This also meant that when it came to his children, he always feared the worst. My mother was submissive within the marriage, so there really was no recourse for me as a child. My father’s way of raising myself and three other siblings was not up for debate. We were well taken care of, provided for in the best way possible, but we always lacked one thing. Genuine affection.

Why do Caribbean parents find it so hard to be affectionate? According to sociology research, parents in collectivist societies may be more restrained in the communication of close relatedness, but demonstrate their love for children through self-sacrifice and meeting children’s needs (Lim and Lim, 2004Rothbaum and Trommsdorff, 2007Clayton, 2014).

Change starts with us

What is a collectivist society?

According to study.com, Collectivism in cultural terms refers to a culture that privileges family and community over individuals. For example, children in collectivist societies are likely to take care of elderly parents if they fall ill and will change their own plans in the event of a family emergency.

I can only speak from what I’ve observed, and it appears that the Caribbean has a widely collectivist culture. In collectivist cultures, your group identity is very important: rather than thinking of yourself simply as an individual unit, you find that the group you’re a part of is very important. Things like decision making often happen within a family, and younger members look to and respect the advice of elders.

Think about it for a minute. How many times were your thoughts and emotions brushed aside as a child? ‘Speaking up’ was never an option, and your opinions were often taken as being ‘rude.’ Let’s contrast this with individualistic societies, such as those found within the suburban and wealthy U.S. demographic.

“Telling my children I love them isn’t a habit. It is my constant reminder to them that they are the best thing that has ever happened to me.”

Toni Morrison

Individualism

An individualistic culture is quite the opposite to that of collectivism.There is a noticeable difference when it comes to communication and general ‘openness.’ Giving children the freedom to be heard changes the way they see themselves. Of course, this can cause incidences of abuse of privilege on the part of the child, so a balance must be maintained when it comes to authority. Children who are raised in individualistic societies tend to be treated as such. Individuals. They are often shown more affection, as their parents display a higher level of communication with them. This openness deepens the bond between parent and child, and it’s not ‘weird’ or uncomfortable to hug every now and then, and say… “I love you.”

How do we change?

The question is, do we need to change a part of us that has been with us for centuries? Or should we just continue to show love through our actions?

I am the mother of a 12 year old boy and despite the cultural norms and my upbringing, I am raising my son within an individualistic family dynamic. There is no discomfort when it comes to our displays of affection and it gives me joy when he randomly kisses my cheek. As a bonus, I take pride in the fact that I am preparing him for a future where he is unafraid to express love toward his mate and his children, all while taking on the serious responsibilities of manhood. This is how we break a cycle. Change starts with us.

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